Trail-Cam Photo Friday

Hard to believe summer is about gone. You will be hunting in a matter of weeks, to further fire you up…

cam mike twitter freak buck

Mike posted this freak on Twitter; won’t score squat, but the coolest buck I’ve seen so far this year.

cam conn 1 2017

Conn sent this beauty.

mi cam scott 2017

From longtime blogger Scott: “…real nice buck that we have on camera on our property. Hope he sticks around, killer brows…”

md danny bucks

Longtime blogger Danny has been watching 30 bucks this summer, and he has thousands of cam photos. He reports, “A couple of the bachelor groups have combined.  Sunday evening there was a group of 18 bucks together.  As you can see, a couple of them were pushing a bit. Which I thought was strange since they are still in velvet. But I guess when there is that much testosterone in one spot it’s bound to happen.”

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KS 2017 big buck

The 3 photos above this caption are from an area in Kansas where I’ll be hunting and filming in early December. Their patterns will certainly have changed by then; I hope one of the bucks is still alive and around, especially the bottom one from my wireless Spartan, that’s a big deer.

drop tine 2017

We got this one picture of Drop Tine at a mineral lick in late July; we have 6 cameras running within 600 acres and have not gotten another pic of him. I’d be willing to bet we don’t get another one, amazing how some bucks are just not photogenic. They seem to have a 6th sense for avoiding cameras!

va cam 2017 2 shooters

Two more big deer that have turned up on my friend’s Virginia farm; we’ve identified at least 6 shooters, and 3 bucks that will go 150-plus. The buck on the bottom is the latest one to run the gap, one of the best places to hang a trail camera.

Good luck!

Trail-Camera Tuesday, July 2017

va split brow

This buck just showed up on a VA farm I hunt, don’t know what spooked him. Big split brow on left!

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Heavy VA buck going through that same little gap between 2 cornfields–one of best setups for a camera–gonna be a 9-pointer.

good spartan compressed

Martin sent this top-quality image from his Spartan camera. I have begun using these cameras exclusively this summer, and am impressed, especially with the Spartan Go Cam (powered by Verizon in my case) which sends images to an app on my phone. Look for these cameras and images on BIG DEER TV.

spartan big VA buck

From one of my Spartan cameras in a secret spot, see if you can make out that buck coming in from 12 o’clock. He looks and acts like an old deer.

MI big 8

Longtime blogger Scott has his eye, and camera, on a nice 8 with great brows.

zach 10 pt

My friends Zach and Ellie have only pulled one card so far, but they are seeing some great bucks, including this pretty 10.

Setting up to be a good year from what I’m seeing! Send me you cam pictures to post, I’ll never give away your location. Your secret buck is safe with me.

 

 

 

 

 

First Trail-Camera Pictures of 2017!

The pictures are starting to roll in. Take a look and get fired up for the 2017 deer season, which will be here before you know it. Please send me your camera photos to share; I’ll never reveal the location of where your big buck is—we just want to see him and enjoy him, and dream. Plus, if we post your cam picture on the blog, we’ll send you a BIG DEER hat.

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Our friend Kim sent the pictures above. Of the 5-year-old “Splitz” (image 2) Kim reports: “last year is the first year his right antler split.”

Actually, that is pretty common. Biologists say that most whitetail bucks have non-typical genes in their blood, but splits, stickers, etc. don’t start to show until a buck matures to 4 or 5 years old.

va jack 1

This VA buck from my friend’s farm seems to say, “Hey man, time to refresh the minerals!

va clubby

Jack named this 8-point buck Clubby.

va bear

Surprise! This young bear walked past the same camera as Clubby an hour later.

MD dan

This is one of the best of 30 bucks that our friend Danny has captured on camera this summer. “I got 5,000 pictures in June alone, most of them bucks,” Danny said. Read more on this 30-buck phenomenon in a later post, once I research it a bit more.

va drop tanner

My buddy Tanner set his camera near his tree stand, and almost immediately a bachelor group showed up beneath it, including the big-bodied drop-tine. I hope he sticks around and Tanner gets him!

mt brow

Finally, our TV producer Justin stepped out his front door and snapped a pic of this WILD buck feeding on his Asiatic day lilies. Can you say brow tines! Come to find out, it is not uncommon for bucks to come down out of the hills and summer in the town limits.

Summer of Snakes and Ticks!

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The other day I told you that after the mild winter of 2016, many entomologists have predicted a longer and more severe tick season this summer. From some of the responses I got from that post on social media, it appears the experts were right.

People from Connecticut (heart of Lyme disease country) to Mississippi to Texas reported that ticks are bad and thick. Jeff from Kentucky told me, “Worse tick season I’ve ever seen in Kentucky, and I’ve see some bad ones. Stand in the grass one minute and you’ll pull off 20 of them!”

The short, mild winter can also be blamed for an increase of another critter we love to hate, snakes! For example, snake bites in Georgia are up 40 percent this year, and South Carolina is reporting a 30 percent increase. North Carolina has seen a notable spike in bites.

I tell you this because July 4th weekend is the unofficial beginning of deer season 2017. It’s hot out, but our minds are starting to turn toward cooler October days and what they might bring. This weekend, in between flying the flag and celebrating America with family and friends, many of us will slip away to the woods to set out more minerals, hang trail cameras, or just look around and dream.

Remember those ticks and snakes crawling out there and take precautions!

boots tick

The best thing you can do is to wear knee-high boots, which protect against both snakes and ticks. From July to September, I NEVER go into the woods without tall boots. These will alleviate 90% of potential problems.

Spray your clothes with Permethrin, use Deet and remember these tips to protect from ticks.

On to snakes, which I totally hate. About 30 percent of snakebites are “dry,” meaning no venom is injected. Some 7,500 venomous snakebites are reported each year in the U.S, but only about 5 people a year die, thanks to anti-venom.

Obviously look around and be careful where you step. Before pouring out minerals and setting cameras, when your arms and hands are lower to the ground, look close and make sure the coast is clear of snakes.

Your snake boots will protect you 99% of the time. But if on the off-chance bitten you’re bitten, get to a clinic or doctor fast as you can. Try to remember the size and color pattern of the snake that bit you. If you think or know that the snake was venomous, call 911.

I am so damn scared of snakes that if I get bit, I’ll probably have a heart attack and be down and done. But you should remember these snake-bite tips from the Mayo Clinic:

–While waiting for medical help, remain calm and move beyond the snake’s striking distance.

–Remove jewelry and tight clothing before you start to swell.

–Position yourself, if possible, so that the bite is at or below the level of your heart.

–Clean the wound, but don’t flush it with water. Cover it with a clean, dry dressing.

–Caution! Don’t use a tourniquet or apply ice. Don’t cut the wound or attempt to remove the venom.

On a brighter note, enjoy the woods this weekend and have a great 4th!

Pre-Season Tip: How to Hang a Tree Stand in the Woods

wool plaid luke

While Montana bowhunter Luke Strommen prefers to hunt big bucks on the fringes of fields when possible, he realizes that hanging sets back in the woods is an integral part of the game.

“In mid-season, by hunting back in the woods a ways, you can catch the bucks that come off a field early and first in the morning–these are usually the most mature and the largest deer. And these stands can be anytime-of-day stands, where you might shoot a buck morning, midday or evening.”

In a woods-hunting situation, you have to get to your stand very early, morning or afternoon advises Luke. “You have to pick your poison because it is difficult to pick a trail to your stand where whitetails won’t pass and wind the scent you left with your feet.”

Luke notes that after a hunt, it can sometimes be tough to get out of a woods stand without deer seeing or hearing you, thus contaminating the area for future hunts. “One trick is just before you climb down, blow a coyote howl or a light yap. An old friend from Idaho told me that years ago, and it works. Any deer close by will clear out, and then you leave unnoticed.

“Also, if by chance you hunt near train tracks or highway, move fast out of the stand when a train rumbles through or a big rig roars past. Out here in Montana we call that ‘noise camo.’”