Need A Salvage Permit For Deer Skull/Antlers?

IL deadhead - CopyDuring the winter and spring shed hunt of 2017, hunters across the country have been finding, picking up and posting on social media some giant “deadheads,” like this 200-class skull making the rounds on Facebook.

Let me remind you that if you find any-size skull w/antlers in the woods you might—actually you probably– need to obtain a salvage permit (or at least permission) from the state to possess and transport that skull.

In most states a deadhead—the skull and rack from a buck that died of disease, was hit by a car or was lost by a hunter last season—is treated like a roadkill buck, and subject to the same state roadkill laws, which in most cases means you need to call a conservation officer or sheriff and get a permit (or at the very least official permission) before you move and take possession of the antlers.

States where I can confirm you need a salvage permit include: Kansas, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma and Indiana, and there are many more. Every shed hunter should check the state laws and know for certain sure. The last thing you need is to come home with a skull with big antlers, post a picture of it on Facebook or Instagram and promptly get a call or visit from a game warden asking if you have the proper salvage permit.

I’d like to greatly expand the list of state salvage laws for deer, so please let me know your state’s regulation, if any, by commenting below.

Shed-Hunting: Antler Trivia

Big Buck Nation Milk River 2008 003Did you know…some fun facts about antlers and shed-hunting:

The #1 Typical Whitetail Antler in the Shed Record Book is a 6-point 104 6/8” left side picked up in Illinois 1992.

The #1 Non-Typical Whitetail Antler in the Shed Record Book is a 24-point 156 5/8” right side found in Saskatchewan 2007.

Individual bucks often shed their antlers the same week every year.

Antlers are the fastest-growing tissue in the animal kingdom.

Increasing daylight and a buck’s falling testosterone cause antlers to shed.

Once a buck drops one antler, the other one usually falls off within hours.

Huge whitetail antlers can be found in many city parks and suburbs. Get permission to shed hunt these type areas if you can.

When you’re out looking for antlers, mark off small grids, walk slowly and look straight down for a brown or white piece of bone.

Look for pieces of antler as you hunt: a tine or the white gleam of a beam.

Rainy days are good for shed searching—wet antlers shine and stand out.

Squirrels and porcupines chew on antlers for the calcium they provide.

Sheds are valued by size and grade, from Grade A Brown (best) to old, white chalk.

Deer antlers can fetch $5 to $18 a pound, depending on grade and size.

A matched set of grade A fresh sheds from a trophy 6-point elk can be worth $500 to $1,000.

South Dakota Shed Hunter Up to 70 Antlers and Counting

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Update from our expert, Kelly “Shedhunter” Kirsch:

Mike: Walked 17.8 miles on Saturday, it was very warm, and picked up 15. One real nice set, maybe in the 160s. I found the antlers about ¾-mile apart.

Sunday I hurt, so I used the Quad to cover a sunflower field and picked 12 more. Total for the year is right on 70 sheds, not a bad start.

SD kelly 3

Take a look at that sunflower field. A lot of people I run into that think that antlers have to be knocked off by tree, fence post, or something. But there’s really nothing like that out here in places. Sometimes the antlers just fall off, and I have watched bucks hit the ground with their antlers to remove them.—Kelly

Shed Hunting: 5 Matched Sets!

sd kelly shed 1

Our friend Kelly “Sheddhunter” Kirsch from South Dakota filed this report from the antler fields:

First hard day of walking two weeks ago, and looks like people are beating me at what I do so well. There were boot prints in most all the places I walked. I did manage to find a few sheds they left behind. The land these people are walking is all public, so I’ve tied up some adjacent lands where they ought to push the deer to. Hope it works out.

This past weekend I walked 17 miles and found 5 matched sets (picture above). Walked another 8 miles the next day and only found 5 antlers. Funny how in some areas the bucks have dropped their antlers, but just a few miles down the road they have not dropped them yet.

sd kelly shed 2

The picture of this single is one I missed last year. I walked the same route 4 different times last year and never found it, but I did last weekend.—Sheddhunter

Also click on the top picture to enlarge it, and see the nice 9-point dead-head that Kelly picked up!

Antler hunting is kicking into high gear, send me your field reports and shed photos to post.

Illinois Coyote Hunt: 5 Critters and a Shed

Longtime BIG DEER blogger Scott from MI and his buddies made their annual trek to coyote camp, and he recaps their awesome hunt:

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Hi Mike: We headed out about 9:30 am Thursday morning Jan. 26th from Michigan and made the 6-hour trip to northwest Illinois, to a place along the Mississippi River.  The normal gang was along for the hunt, good friends John, Ryan, Mike and Jason. My dad Russ did not make the trip this year but I told him I would keep him posted with the play by play if we got some action.

The weather was pretty good, mid-teens at night and mid-20s during the day. Winds were a little stronger than we would have liked, about 15 mph average with gusts over 25 mph but the direction was ok. The wind was not too bad in the lower areas where we call. Those bottom lands had almost no snow, but we had a good couple inches of fresh powder on the hilltops and sides.

Mike and I decided to make our first set at Jessie’s draw, a spot that has produced coyotes almost every year we have hunted it. It’s a large ravine that runs the better part of a mile downward from the hilltop. We made our way to the stand location, sneaking in behind some pines so as not to be spotted by any game that was down below.

We set the Foxpro between us and Mike started with some coyote vocals, then rolled into some distress house cat sounds. Going back and forth between the two for 28 minutes I was thinking nothing was going to show. But then a coyote popped out, scaling the bottom of the hill about 100 yards away. Soon as it cleared the brush I gave a mouth bark to stop it and put it down with my T/C Venture chambered in .243, with a 70-grain Nosler ballistic tip that Mike had hand loaded for me. It was a nice-size male, good way to start the day.

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For our 3rd set of the morning we went to another part of the property that has produced for us in the past as well. As we were approaching our setup we noticed something moving across the hilltop about 600 yards away. Turned out to be a coyote heading down into the draw we were just about to call. He hadn’t seen us, so we made the decision to get into position quickly and see if we could call him in before he got too far away.

Mike set up on the closest finger coming out of the large draw and facing the coyote. I looked over the next finger back, in case he tried to flank us. Mike ran the same coyote howls and then some distressed cat sounds with the Foxpro that he did earlier. About 15 minutes later I heard a shot. After he finished the call I walked over to see a guy grinning from ear to ear. Mike had just scored his first kill with his new Cooper rifle chambered in .204 Ruger. The coyote had come running right to him along the hilltop and he was able to stop it with a mouth bark at 40 yards; he put it right down with a 35-grain handload. It was a large male that weighed in at 45 pounds! I sent dad text messages telling him that we had scored on a couple.

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The winds picked up in the afternoon and we didn’t have any more luck the rest of the day. That night we found out that we had gained permission to hunt a large piece of property where we used to call a few years back ago. Excited to hear this, we set a game plan for the next morning.  John, Jason and Ryan would try to cover as much ground as they could with the wind direction we had.

On the first set John and Jason set up on a point overlooking the intersection of two large ravines. John set out his Foxpro and started calling with a TT Frenzy rabbit distress. About 5 minutes into the call a yote came running right in. John gave a mouth bark to stop him at 80 yards and took him with his Tikka .223 using 55-grain Hornady Vmax ammo. Another nice male coyote.

On their 3rd  call of the morning John and Jason made their way down the steep ravine and back up to another nice ridgetop. They set up in a new spot where they could see a good ways off. John started with the TT Frenzy again and about 3 minutes in, a coyote came running in from the bottom. John gave a mouth bark to stop and when he squeezed the trigger the gun dried fired.

scott jason

The coyote, now on alert, took off running and Jason was able to crack off a shot at about 50 yards and put it down with his .22 Hornet. It was a nice-colored female. Jason has been 4 for 4 with that gun since he’s had it. The 35-grain Hornady Varmit Express does a good job on the predators.

After hearing from John that they had called in two within an hour using the TT Frenzy sound I said to Mike, “I guess we better try some rabbit sounds!” The wind had switched directions a little on the way to our next set so we decided to call a tall ridgetop overlooking a huge valley with a power line clear cut running through it. I placed the FoxPro call between Mike and me and started with the TT Frenzy. It wasn’t much past a minute and I caught movement out of the comer of my eye. I turned to the right and saw a coyote trotting down the finger toward me, trying to get downwind. The critter disappeared in the ditch between us.

In a slightly controlled panic, knowing the yote may catch our scent soon as it popped up, I spun around and tried to pick the spot where it might show. A few seconds later it appeared 40 yards farther to my right than I had thought. I gave a mouth bark as soon as it cleared and took the shot. The animal disappeared and I wasn’t sure if I had hit it. Mike and I walked over and saw it lying 15 yards down the ditch. That was number 5 for our trip! I texted Dad to let him know we had just killed 3 in about 2 hours.

Ryan was not able to have any luck getting a yote, but did find a nice heavy shed antler while walking in to make a call. We left it for the property owner that had given us permission to hunt the property again. Hopefully 2 dead coyotes and a shed antler on his property will earn us an invite back in the future! We had another great hunt and are already looking forward to next year.

Thanks Mike and keep up the good work!–Scott from MI